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of fiscal resources and the state of our economy. i'm not a foreign policy guy or a strategic guy, but that seems, obviously, right to me. if you can't aboard the kind of military you need to project power, if you can't afford to fund the state department in the kinds of ways it should be doing, no matter how many people we have or how wealthy some of our citizens are. i don't worry, if you don't mind my digressing slightly, i don't worry about china being a bigger economy than we are. i don't honestly care how big china is. they do have three-and-a-half times more people than we do. i'm more concerned with how big we are -- >> how big or how rich? >> well, i put them in the same -- rich being gdp. how successful are we economically. um, and so i do think it is, i think resolving the fiscal thing is of essential importance to our business community in terms of deciding how much they're going to spend, where they're going to invest, how many people they're going to hire and, therefore, to our position in the world. not just the problem of our debt and deficit, but unless we, unless
around the hill. there is a domestic component to driving foreign policy that can't be overlooked. >> eliot: tina? >> his speech at the convention was an audition piece. >> eliot: not every audition works. >> yes. that was a kerry no one saw before. i was -- in the stadium. people were kind of -- sighed when he got up there. he knocked it out of park. >> eliot: people remembered that. >> he was the surprise sleeper speaker. >> eliot: treasury, tim geithner leaving. does he take somebody from wall street? >> undoubtedly. >> eliot: you think he does? >> absolutely. >> eliot: come on! so many people understand banking finance better than those guys. >> yes. ralph nader. >> eliot: robert rice. i would put him in any cabinet position. host of new york 1 errol louis and editor tina but dupuy. our special election night of the view finder is ahead. more "viewpoint" coming up. smiles make more smiles. when the chocolate is hershey's. life is delicious. [ piano plays ] troy polamalu's going deeper. ♪ ♪ and so is
adult cancer. onid cameron's speech foreign policy at the lord mayor's annual banquet. this will be his third time speaking at a banquet since becoming prime minister in 2010. join us for his remarks at 3:30 p.m. eastern. later at georgetown university, musician and activist bono talks about social enterprise and social movements, like his project red campaign. our coverage begins at 6:00 p.m. eastern. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. i am proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with a major problem -- the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise, i am open to new ideas, i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me making over $250,000 are not asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly elected congress starts work in janua
. the euphoria of re-election is quickly giving way to hard reality of governing with the foreign policy crisis bubbling from iran to syria. plus, lingering questions about the terror attack in benghazi, which will result in those three different house and senate committees, grilling administration officials next thursday. >> hopefully now that we're past the election the administration will do the right thing. coming up to the election they did notch they claim to be the most pope and transparent administration ever but they are not going the basics in sharing with congress this basic information. >> one of the three panels the house foreign affairs committee invited secretary of state hillary clinton to testify about the terror attack for the first time. >> we are very committed to working with the congress throughout the process. >> on the domestic front second term issues are as thorny, with the president pushing for bipartisan deal on immigration reform and that eluded several predecessors. his campaign manager conducted the time conference call of the election season today and did a victo
security challenges and the foreign policy challenges we face, i say that the number one challenge is getting our fiscal house in order. getting a handle on the debt, getting a handle on the deficit which are critical in order to get the economy growing again and people back to work. and i think that is the over -- it's certainly the number one domestic challenge. my point is it's always the number one national security challenge. why? because a healthy economy and a healthy balance sheet undergirds everything we do internationally. it funds our military, it gives strength to our diplomacy, it allows us to be an attractive trading partner which gives us economic influence. it undergirds everything we do overseas. but secondly, it also undergirds the power of the american idea. the american idea is political democracy and free markets makes for a stable situation in the long term but also makes for a prosperous society that is able to deliver on its people. that is really what america has stood for. and by our failure to resolve our own problems and get our economy growing and going
. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for international and security affairs here in berlin. are we likely to see a second attempt at a reset of relations with moscow? >> a couple of months ago, the u.s. president indicated through russian counterparts that after the election, he would have more flexibility -- the u.s. president indicated to his russian counterparts. i think there is more room for political initiatives. i think the cooperation will remain limited, given the domestic situation in russia. >> let me ask you -- the obama administration during its first four years shifted emphasis of u.s. policy to the asia-pacific. that reduced the significance of europe's importance. do you think we will see the same? >> absolutely. given the inward looking mode of u.s. society, given the financial constraints of the u.s., there is no alternative. the crucial question is -- will the europeans deliver? can they deliver in terms of financial contributions to international crisis managemen
here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evident by the remotely standing crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president, transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the are presidential cycle to impact the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where as necessary, seeks con fir nation, goes through reassessment, definition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrates to the changes, or as people say, the lack of changes, here in washington. at t
policy, jobs policy, foreign policy. it is all woven into the same fabric. you cannot talk about any one of those without talking about the rest of them. amerigas to bring a skill set to the next generation. -- america house to bring a skill sets to the next generation. we have to be a competitive generation. the amount of power is probably unprecedented in the world today. that does not mean that america is getting weaker. that should be good news to us. we have to rebuild our infrastructure and so on, but we are capable of doing that. most of the world looks to us to lead with allies in relationships, not dictate, not occupy, but to bring leadership along where we can find common interests. >> let's hope you are right. thank you so much. now to bravery and finally honored prepare. and -- finally honored. she was born into an indian family, but found herself working behind enemy lines tour world war ii. she was eventually captured and killed by the nazis. today, she is honored. here is a remarkable story. >> in a quiet london square where a young indian girl once played, a crowd of seve
. >> what do we expect -- what are you expecting from the new leadership in terms of foreign policy? >> mostly a continuation of policies as we have seen the mayan past. china's major priority to stability in as regional environment but also globally. china needs stability in order to promote economic policies. >> thank you very much for coming in to talk with us. >> you are welcome. >> we will also have a look at the politically sensitive topic of rich and poor in china, a gap that has widened over the past 10 years, coming a little bit later in the program. moving on to syria -- "i am not a puppet, and i will live and die in syria," defiant words from syria's president. >> in an interview with the satellite broadcaster of russia today, assad about offers of safe passage to another country in exchange for leaving power. >> he warned that foreign intervention in syria would have a domino impact around the world. we begin with the latest. >> here is where the first protests of assad took place. this video claims to show the result of a government air strike on the city's great mosque
-- institute. i'm delighted to see all of you today. i think the interest in foreign policy and the wake of our presidential election is evident by the standing room only crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle that may have an impact on the policy process. so, i take it that it is a good sign that there is a much interest in the foreign-policy process by your presence here today. i think the transition from a first to second on the administration may begin the day after election, but it does not end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the new old team goes through the inevitable time of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, but fiscal cliff for example, and packed for policy. let's not forget, as the world rick roberts to the changes -- or some people get -- some people say, a lack of changes -- here in washington. let's not forget that hist
have agreed to draft a joint pledge for economic and foreign policies. the move is part of their plan to field a single candidate. the democratic united party candida candidates disclosed the drafts as different venues. >> translator: i will ask them to talk to with the details about the policy as soon as possible. >> translator: we will discuss ways to field a single candidate to realize a change of government. that is what the people want. >> moon and ahne held a phone conference, and agreed to sbree grate their campaign processes and begin talks on how to choose a single candidate. they will explain their views this week. the two nominees plan to unite against park. she's leading the polls ahead of next month's election. >>> south korean lawmakers have decided to spend more on a public relations campaign for a group of disputed islands. south korea controls the islands in the sea of japan. south kor japanese lay claim to the territory they call takeshima. members of a foreign affairs committee decided to tripled budget to about $5.7 million. they say the money will be used to consu
-- important foreign policy issues. we'll also be joined at the half hour by terry o'neill president of the national organization for women. again, take your calls at 1-866-55-press. let's get right into it. and starting with david petraeus and what that's all about. but first -- >> this is the "full court press." >> other headlines -- >> bill: slow down. >> other headlines making news on this monday, ashley judd responded to rumors over the weekend that she's considering a run for senate against mitch mcconnell in kentucky in 2014. >> bill: go, go, go! >> the actor telling "us weekly" magazine she's hannered people have approached her about running but she's not ready to think about it just yet saying we just came out of an election. everyone's focus should be on coming together now and moving forward. she was an active supporter of the president on the campaign trail and has not ruled the senate run out completely. >> bill: i would love to see her or anybody challenge mitch mcconnell. that would be as good as gettin
the second-term challenges and then foreign policy including the situation in syria and iran and the latest fallout from benghazi ed henry is live at the white house. a lot of challenges from abroad. >>reporter: you talk about the fiscal cliff, they have that and after what has been happening with syria and that is play out with violence on the ground. assad will not give in. the euphoria from tuesday night, you talk to people inside the white house, they knew that is evaporating and we have to get down to business so today the president got a stream of calls from world leaders, including from the u.k., and david cameron, and binyamin netanyahu from israel, as well, congratulations, but, also, in doubt the phone calls, a lot of business being conducted with the president realizing particularly in the middle east there is a lot of major problems to confront. i am told by senior officials before election day the chief of staff, jack lou and others have been meeting and planning and if the president were re-elected they would have to hit the ground running on domestic issues and foreign policy
.i.a. then former senator evan bayh on the fiscal cliff. then senior editor of foreign policy magazine will be on. ♪ host: good morning, welcome to "washington journal." the fbi investigation that led to the resignation of general david petraeus has expanded to general john allen. the impact of all this on the intelligence community and national security will be part of several hearings on capitol hill later this week. lawmakers return to washington today amid a shake-up of the president obama national security team, facing the looming issue of the so-called fiscal cliff. that is where we want to begin today this morning. president obama will meet later on with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not compromise on cuts to medicare and social security. what is your take on this? avoiding this -- avoiding the fiscal cliff? host: remember, you can send us a clear message, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail, journal@c-span.org. courtesy of the newseum, washington, front page of that newspaper and many of the newspapers this morning, including "the washington post,"
sadloff and delighted to see you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of our presidential election is certainly evidence by the standing remotely crowd we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition, a transition even with the same president, transitions are the most flute and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process, and so i'm -- i take it as a good sign there's so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now, i think the transition from a first to a second obama administration may, of course, begin the day after an election, but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for sometime. as the president's new or old team takes shape, and where necessary, seeks confirmation, as the new old team goes through the inevidentble period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities and as other issues, domestic issues, the fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and not forget as the world recalibrates changes or
an audience. you know, when you are the president's foreign policy spokesman and you are hanging out and have the israeli prime minister and then the chairman trying to reach a middle east peace, you go, okay, what we tell the press? and you say, you can tell them whatever you want except for this and that. and what else is there? [laughter] but now we have dennis ross was out of government. and he is writing a new book. when you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with iran, whether the nuclear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. in 2009 when you were at the state department as the special envoy forswore wrong, there was a strategy of both engagement and pressure. going back to 2009 there is the engagement that has continued at a certain level through the five plus one process, but then there has been focused over the last couple of years on pressure sanctions and the 40% drop in iranian currency shows that we now have the pressure of the last couple
. host: benjamin pauker is senior editor of "foreign policy magazine." we'll get to your calls in a minute. could there be foreign policy fallout in the benghazi attacks on libya? guest: i think there's a lot we don't know. this is one of those scandals that comes out in dribs and drabs. drip, leak, leak, leak. i think there is a sort of consensus that we want to know more. the american public wants to know more. certainly journalists do. there could be political fallout from it. this is a week where there's going to be a number of hearings on ben gaza. so both the house and senator intelligence committees were meeting. there is certainly, congressionally, the desire to hear more and hear more facts. there are big questions that are unanswered. both in the time frame of what happened in the attack, little bits of information, but also in terms of whether the u.s. was ill prepared or naive in terms of providing security for ambassador chris stevens. any tragedy where an ambassador dies and three other americans, there needs to be an investigation. host: will in tennessee, indepe
is on their way home. sports breakfast is on next. >> what it means for the president foreign policy agenda moving forward. >> and as we head to break, a live look outside. look at that nice looking tree. not a lot of traffic out there. a lot of people staying at home. latest weather and traffic from tucker and julie when we come back. ♪ ♪ [ multiple sounds making melodic tune ] ♪ [ male announcer ] at northrop grumman, every innovation, every solution, comes together for a single purpose -- to make the world a safer place. that's the value of performance. northrop grumman. >>> let's talk sports now. soccer playoffs kick off this morning. tucker is happy. dc united. nick scores after a shot by one of his teammates. the dynamo would make a second half surge scoring three times to win 3-1. the second leg is next saturday at rfk stadium. >>> not many people saw this one coming. i did. los angeles lakers signed mike antoni as the new coach. worth a mere $12 million. he has coached the suns and the knicks. known for fast paced offenses but no defense at all. widely speculated the team would rehi
hill, the prime minister should make a speech about foreign-policy. let me say at the outset that this is a government that is outward looking, standing up for interest in the world, protecting security at home and promoting our values abroad. we spoke up for the arabs bring. we led international action to support the libyan people and getting rid of muammar gaddafi. we stepped up the use sanctions against iran, and at the forefront of efforts to isolate assad in syria. we've got us out of the bailout fund and rejecting the treaty that was not of interest. i am a prime minister who said even in tough economic times of britain will not break its promises to the poorest of our world. i am sharing the united nations high-level panel of development with ambition of eradicating absolute poverty in our world. i am a prime minister who will work closely with president obama in a renewed effort on the middle east peace process, and let us congratulate him tonight on winning a historic second term. yes, i am a prime minister who will -- you will bring troops home from afghanistan. let
, economic, and fiscal issues. host: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. that has been one caution. the next step would be considering some kind of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran pose a nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's la
: let's go to foreign policy because "the washington times" as this headline -- scott wilson, do you expect that he does that? troops on the ground? guest: i do not expect troops on the grand. as far as the president would go in syria, the next step is some kind of a no-fly zone. you will start seeing the model that he put in place and advocated for in libya. he is someone who moves incrementally. the next real step is the first plunge into military would be directly harming the rebels. they do not know the rebels that well. they do not want to start sending heavy weapons to groups that are clearly influenced by islamists. so that has been one caution. then the next step would likely be considering some sort of international no-fly zone like what took place in libya. host: iran's nuclear program? do we know what he might do? guest: i think in terms of old assertions of next steps, some of that may wait for the next secretary of state. this is something that the next secretary of state would be shepherding through and then stick it in somebody else's lap. it is probably strategically
of the years, never before an audience. [laughter] when you are the president's foreign-policy spokesman and handing out in the roosevelt room as you have the israeli prime minister and then chairman arafat and the president trying to reach middle east piece you go and say, okay. but we tell the press. look, you can tell them what everyone except for this, this, and this. what else is there? but now we have the dennis two is out of the government. and writing a new book. so if you think about the next four years, clearly how the united states relationship evolves with ron, then the clear issue can be resolved short of conflict will be among those, if not the most pivotal issue facing the president in his second term. so start off, in 2009 when you were at the state department's as the special envoy for ron there was a strategy, both engagement. go back to 2009. the engagement has continued at a certain level, but then there has been the focus over the last couple of years on pressure, sanctions, and clearly the 40% drop in the value of a running currencies shows that actually is having t
director and i'm delighted to see all of you here today. i think the interest in foreign policy in the wake of other presidential election is certainly evident by the standing room only crowd that we have here today. we are now already into the process of transition. transition even with the same president. transitions are the most fluid and receptive moments in the presidential cycle to have an impact on the policy process. and so i'm, i take it, as a good sign there is so much interest in the foreign policy process by your presence here today. now i think that the transition from a first to a second obama administration may of course begin the day after an election but it doesn't end on inauguration day. this process is going to continue for some time. as the president's new or old team takes shape and where necessary seeks confirmation. as the new old team goes through the inevitable period of reassessment and redefinition of priorities and opportunities, and as other issues, domestic issues, fiscal cliff, for example, impacts foreign policy, and let's not forget as the world recalibrate
american. and all three are very conservative on foreign policy. some domestic policies, they will find ortiz and rubio will slightly lead some of the charge in the republican ranks in the senate to adopt some kind of comprehensive immigration reform. i think the time has come for the country to do comprehensive reform. as i have said many times over the last year or two, immigration reform is going to change the politics of the nation just by the nature of who eventually becomes or is able to regularize their status and be able to vote. it was ronald reagan in 1986 who signed into law the last comprehensive immigration reform, which allowed about 3 million people to regularize their status -- most of them hispanic. within five years, those people were able to vote. effecting much of what happened in the clinton era in terms of what was happening in democratic resurgence. i think this time around, we're talking 11 million to 12 million people. immigration reform is accomplished next year, did you can assume within five, six, seven years many of those people will then be able to enter th
, 20 individuals with long experience in the intelligence foreign policy, national security arena, who serve as a sounding word and resource for the director about -- board and resource for the director about issues the agency is facing. we meet quarterly. leon panetta started this. general petraeus carried ton. we review a variety of issues and offer our thoughts to the direct quor for whatever they are worth. host: let's move on to, then, the fiscal issue. the so-called fiscal cliff. lots of stories in the papers today that president obama's meeting with labor leaders who are insisting that the president not change entitlements. no cuts to medicare and social security. do you agree? guest: i think some adjustments are going to have to be made. social security today is a lot different than it was when franklin roosevelt first instituted it. it's not as if it's etched in stone. that said, it's got to be a balanced approach. i think that's what the president is going to say. the two actually save the entitlement programs the nation is on the road to bankruptcy, to save them we have to m
in recent foreign- policy history is on tv defending david petraeus without actually addressing the real problems with the petraeus' record. those are the fact he manipulated the white house about afghanistan, ran a campaign in iraq there was brutally savage including the worst of the worse, sunni militiamen, shiite death squads. then you go back to the training of the iraqi army that had similar problems. for me, all the while he is going around the country talking about honor and integrity. >> that was michael hastings speaking on piers morgan. >> i think michael hastings is a fascinating case he wrote a cover story about general mcchrystal on "the rolling stone" who ended general mcchrystal's career. what was amazing is nobody doubted the authenticity of the quotes included in this article, yet huge numbers of the most prominent media figures who covered the war in afghanistan attack michael hastings facetiously -- attacked michael hastings viciously, accusing him of violating the trust of the general. not because he reported things that are supposed to be off the record, but they say
. >>> and you're in "the situation room." happening now, a dangerous new foreign policy challenge for president obama as word comes that iranian fighter jets have fired -- fired on an unarmed u.s. drone over the persian gulf. you know all about the rallies and political ads, but you'll be surprised to learn how much the obama campaign knew about you. how data mining and number crunching helped re-elect the president. and it may sound strange, but there's already some buzz out there about the next presidential election. we're going to hear about potential candidates for 2016. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama scored a pretty convincing re-election. the president has four more years to pursue his agenda. what can he actually accomplish? john king is joining us now. he's got major challenges and what's on his mind obviously is what's good for the country and his historic legacy. >> you talk about the l word, legacy, whenever someone's re-elected. a closely divided congress, a republican ho
of course continuously focused on his foreign policy and national security agenda. he has great confidence in the acting cia director, confidence in his military and the second of defense and the defense department to carry out the missions that he's assigned to them. but he's got obviously a lot that he wants to get to work on and he's doing that this week. >> broadly, how does this affect the national security team? >> i think these are specific questions about specific individuals and posts. i can say now, even though you haven't asked, i have no announcemented to make with regards to personnel and no speculation to engage in. i can tell you that the president has not made a decision on personnel matters and you will not hear me discuss them until the president has made those decisions and has announced them. >> regarding two specific people you can't extrapolate but two of the president's top military brass either involved in an extramarital affair or inappropriate behavior. is the president worried about a culture, inappropriate culture in the military? >> i really would ask you to no
-election foreign policy priority but it needs to be a priority for several reasons. iraq is a success. it is because of the efforts of the united states and our allies and iraqi people. it is an important success because it is right in the middle of the middle east. it ties into every other problem from iran to sunni-shia relation and energy. it is a democratic state with a lot of flaws. it is a functioning democracy and that is a good day and we need to do our best to continue to encourage. the administration is putting a lot of quiet effort into this and this needs to continue. there are several serious risks. the biggest is that syria will pull iraq asunder as the various groups go in various directions. so far, that has not happened but the longer the situation in syria is allowed to continue, the more likely that very bad scenario will occur. one of the main reasons we kept our troops in iraq and lost 4500 tubes was to maintain the unity of iraq. that depends on plurality and democracy. that's all we have now with all its faults and the need to be supported. the other major threa
to guide america's foreign policy in the next congress. >> reporter: cotton, a law school graduate, was in the 101st airborne division. nine veterans from these wars have just won congressional seats, seven republicans and two democrats. >> this is definitely a historical election for the iraq and afghanistan veterans. there are going to be more in the next congress, twice as many in the next congress as there are currently. >> reporter: seth lynn has a program training veterans running for office. he says that iraq and afghanistan veterans may finally have found their political voice. >> and i think that a lot of people have come home, really established themselves in their communities, become leaders, you know, in business, in public service, within their communities and have now been having a lot more success running for office. >> reporter: despite the influx of 9/11 era veterans into congress, the overall number of veterans is declining. both the house and the senate will have fewer veterans this year than last. democrat tammy duckworth lost both of her legs in iraq, and she h
. coincidentally or not, that 26 of october is the same day that to journalists for foreign policy magazine discovered classified documents detailing security concerns in benghazi. they found those documents lying on the floor of what remained of the u.s. consulate. that, three weeks after the fbi had finally made its way to benghazi to conduct an investigation, an investigation that took less than a day. there has been no explanation as to why the fbi left those classified state department papers on the ground. adding to the coincidences' c'mon the 26 of october, it was on that date that fox news cia operators on the ground in benghazi had asked for, and were denied help four times during the course of the 7-hour assault ambassador christopher stephens, foreign service officer sean smith and cia operatives tie ron woods and glendora the from both former seals were killed in a firefight that move from the cause led to the cia and makes a mile away. a cautionary note tonight, if i may. we want to be very clear that what we are reporting, regardless of sources, of the very best journalists an
serious stuff. iran is firing on a u.s. drone. just the latest foreign policy skirmish for the white house to deal with. what other challenges will the president need to address overseas in the next four years? might be with a new secretary of state. who should have the reins of the department of defense, the cia? that and more with four-star general jack keane. he will give his insight straight ahead. is what drives us to broadcast the world's biggest events in 3d, or live to your seat high above the atlantic ocean. it's what drives us to create eco-friendly race tracks, batteries that power tomorrow's cars, nearlyndestructible laptops, and the sustainable smart towns of the future. at panasonic, we're driven to make what matters most better. just another way we're engineering a better world for you. jamie: well new next hour, thousands of people still without power after superstorm sandy. what needs to be done to prevent widespread outages when that next storm hits? >>> united airlines flight crew calls for help in route to washington, d.c. military jets had to escort the plane to safety
part of the 20th century would bring us a major financial crisis and engulf us in a foreign policy that would overextend us and undermine our national security. to achieve these goals i thought the government would have had to shrink in size and scope, reduce spending, change the monetary system, and reject the unsustainable cost of policing the world and expanding the american empire. the problems seemed to be overwhelming and impossible to solve, yet from my viewpoint, just following the constraints based on the federal government by the constitution would have been a good place to start. just how much did i accomplish? in more ways according to conventional viss wisdom my off and on career in congress from 1976 to 2012, accomplished very little. no named legislation, no named federal buildings or highways, thank goodness. in spite of my efforts the government has grown exponentially, taxes remain excessive, and a prolific increase of incomprehensible regulations continues. wars are constant, and pursued without congressional declaration, deficits rise to the sky, poverty is ramp
? >> there is something to be done. first of all a change in our united states foreign policy. we need to start looking at other groups other than the muslim brotherhood and create a balance of power between both. jenna: sounds like something we'll be talking about for some time to come. a lot of movement in the region. a lot of forces at work. great to have you on the program as always. >> thank you, jenna, washington gearing up to tackle the impending fiscal cliff but the president and the speaker of the house john boehner each drawing lines that they say they will not cross. the major hurdles, that threat to send the economy into a tailspin, that's coming up next. >>> plus a nascar race turning into a full-scale brawl. look at this. mayhem breaking out of the everybody going at it. we'll tell you what set it off. after this. ve lately. but because of business people like you, things are beginning to get rolling. and regions is here to help. making it easier with the expertise and service to keep those wheels turning. from business loans to cash management, we want to be your partner moving forward.
. and as a result, i think what's lacking in our foreign policy and our policy in general is we have an american exceptionalism. we consider ourselves, as obama recently said again, the indispensable nation. as long as we have that attitude, we do not have the ability, the empathy or the compassion to see the world as a globe of which we are a partner. we are operating on the edge of a very dangerous precipice where we continue to contain and to find enemies and find a reason to bloeat our military budgets. >> other nations also feel that way about their country, that they're exceptional and indispensable. >> that's not true. no country i've ever been to has ever felt they were the indispensable nation to the world and could dictate to others what they could do. >> china? >> no. they have one foreign base. we have 800-plus bases. china has no history of aggression. the united states does. we deal with this in the book. >> i want to talk to you about david petraeus. yo you're a former military man. do you believe he should have resigned? i'm curious about your thoughts about him. >> he's part of
gets this foreign policy team together for a second term, not to mention the fact he would rather be focusing now on the fiscal cliff. >> and he is having a news conference tomorrow at 1:30 p.m. eastern from the white house. he is going to be bombarded with questions on this. not exactly the way he wanted to start that news conference, i am sure. thanks very much, gloria. >> sure. >>> she's the florida woman described by one source as bored, a bored, rich socialite. now jill kelley is caught up in this widening scandal. i will ask the head of the intelligence committee, dianne feinstein what she knows about this woman. my interview with senator feinstein next. >> her name has come into question, let me put it that way. [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. but lately she's been coming in with less gray than usual. what's she up to? [ female announcer ]
security foreign policy team in the days leading up to the revelation unwelcome and surprising and shocking to the president two days after he was re-elected because it happened. >> all of this tension, too, within the administration now between the justice department, between the fbi -- >> absolutely. >> -- and the cia. this question of whether to tell the president, when to tell the president -- >> whether to tell anyone. >> along those lines -- >> they made a decision which i think will come in ultimately for a fair amount of criticism which is the decision not to tell the president about it. >> i want to ask andrea a question, not a glib question but a serious question because you have covered powerful men for the last chunk of years, of all walks of life. i want to redirect to what's important. is it fair to say we should not in any way be surprised when men of power, conquers, village leaders are also womanizers, that one could argue that goes with the profile, and can we stop going -- when it happens? >> frankly, you know, that's what foreign diplomats have been saying in the last da
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